Category: Boating Safety

What is Florida’s Boating Under the Influence Law?

boating under the influence

Would you take a few shots, knock back some beers or sip on a slew of cocktails before getting behind the wheel of your car? Well, what makes driving under the influence any different than boating under the influence? Some make the mistake of thinking that BUI is somehow safer than DUI because there are fewer boats on most waterways than there are cars on the road. But the statistics don’t lie; according to the American Boating Association, the leading contributor to fatal boating accidents is alcohol.

That being said, some still decide to recklessly operate their boat inebriated. For those people, there are laws in place to add a little incentive to do the right thing.

Quick Facts About Florida’s Boating Under the Influence Law

  • Drinking and boating is not illegal unless the boat’s operator is above the legal BAC limit of .08 for those 21 years of age and older, or if the officer believes the operator is considerably impaired.
  • An officer is allowed to stop a boat if they catch the operator speeding or operating recklessly.
  • Boating while intoxicated by recreational drugs other than alcohol is also considered boating under the influence.
  • Certain prescription medications that can hinder judgment or reaction times can lead to reckless boat operation and persecution under the boating under the influence law.
  • The US Coast Guard has the right to arrest those found boating under the influence off of Florida’s shoreline.
  • All boats, from canoes to superyachts, fall under Florida’s boating under the influence law.

Consequences for Boating Under the Influence

  • First conviction: $250-$500 and up to six months of jail time
  • Second conviction: $500-$1,000 and up to nine months of jail time
  • Third conviction: $1,000-$2,500 and up to 12 months of jail time

Understand that fines and jail (or even prison time) only become more serious when arrests occur within 10 years of a prior boating under the influence arrest, or when an accident damages property or people.

Last year saw 701 deadly boating accidents. This is a lifestyle we love, but boating safety must be respected and followed in order to keep you, your family and all others who enjoy boating having fun while on the water. Though it may be tempting to indulge while taking the boat out, it is never worth risking your life and the lives of others.

Have fun, be safe and we’ll see you on the water this summer.

5 Water Safety Tips to Keep You Safe this Summer

Though plenty of boaters prefer staying dry on their trips on the water, many others love to enjoy cooling off in the water during these hot summer months. The ocean, streams and even relatively placid lakes can be far different beasts than the swimming pools that most are more familiar with. Before you or your loved ones take a dip, make sure you know these water safety tips to help keep your next boating trip a safe one.

  1. Stay Sober: As we’ve warned before, drinking and boating can be just as dangerous as drinking and driving. The safety risks also apply to swimming after knocking back a few. As alcohol dehydrates you (on top of the scorching sun) and impairs your judgment, it’s easy to see the potential risks you face when trying to swim while impaired. Save the drinks for when you’re back on shore.
  2. Stay Aware: Keep a close eye on friends and family who decide to take a dip. It’s surprisingly easy to lose track of people, especially when currents and waves can unknowingly drift swimmers from your boat. Kids and the elderly are especially important to watch, as they can sometimes lose track of the boat or become fatigued more quickly than others.
  3. Watch the Weather: Especially in the summer months, weather can be… temperamental. Always keep track of the local forecast and an eye out for dark clouds and thunder. At the first signs that a storm may be brewing, pack it in and head back to shore before the waterworks begin. Lightning, especially in Florida, is a deadly serious concern that you do not want to play with.
  4. PFDs for Added Protection: Personal floatation devices (PFDs), aka life jackets, can quite literally be lifesavers when enjoying time on the water. Though you won’t be doing any diving in them, having a PFD on can keep your head above water if you drift away or simply run out of steam while swimming, giving the boater, or emergency services, enough time to reach you and bring you safely back on board.
  5. Never Go Alone: Though we all need a bit of “me” time, going for a swim when boating alone can be a costly mistake. As we stated above, waters can be deceptive, and you can find yourself pulled away from your boat by an unseen current. Even with company, you should let someone on shore know your plan for the day, including float plan and schedule, just in case.

Armed with these water safety tips, we hope you all enjoy the summer on, and in, the water. Just try to keep the drinks for later, keep a close eye on swimmers, watch for bad weather, keep a PFD on and never go it alone as it’s always important that you have a blast without putting safety on the back burner. Have fun and we’ll see you on the water.

Hurricane Preparedness: Ready Your Boat for Hurricane Season 2017

With hurricane season 2017 quickly approaching, it’s officially time to make sure your boat can handle the weather woes that may be headed our way: powerful waves, devastating winds, torrential rain and more. Though we all hope for a quiet season, this is one case where the “better safe than sorry” mantra definitely applies. So, what can you do to make sure your boat is shipshape when the next “big one” comes knocking?

How to Prep for Hurricane Season 2017

  • Call me maybe: Though texting and tweeting may have made actually calling on the phone a rarity, you may want to ring your boat insurer and marina or dock owner to get the lowdown on what you’re covered for in case of a storm. Just as importantly, you can find out what the insurance company expects you to do to prepare for a hurricane. If you don’t do everything expected of you by your insurance company, you may have to foot the bill for repairs after the hurricane wreaks havoc. 
  • Check it out: Just like your pre-departure checklist, you should also create a to-do list of steps to take once a hurricane watch is announced, including the likes of safety equipment to check, legal paperwork to put together and items to stow safely on shore. 
  • If you gotta go, you gotta go: Never–and we mean ever–try to ride out a hurricane in order to keep an eye on your boat. Though you may see your vessel as an extension of the family, the truth is, you should never risk your life for it. Do your best to prepare for the storm and then stay out of its way.

Hurricane season 2017 is coming, and with it, the risk of big storms and major damage. We’ve been mostly lucky in recent years when it comes to hurricanes, but, as we all know, luck can only last so long. Do your due diligence, call your insurance company and marina/dock owner, write up a hurricane season 2017 to-do list and, most of all, get out of the way of the storm or stay safely sheltered if it becomes apparent that you’re in the line of fire. Here’s to a season of safe boating!

That Sinking Feeling: How to Prevent the Nightmare of a Sinking Boat on the Dock

Sinking Boat

You pack up your bags and set off early for a day of fishing with your best buds. After a drive to the dock, it feels great to be by the sea again, salted breeze blowing through your hair, sun lightly kissing your fa– wait a minute. Where did the boat go? It was docked right there just a few months ago. You peer down into the spot that you could have sworn was the last placed you parked “Marla’s Majesty,” only to see her resting on the seabed.

Well, the good news is that this horror story doesn’t have to become your reality. Though this very tragedy is anything but rare, there are steps that you can take to keep your boat afloat when you’re not regularly hitting the water.

How to Keep Your Boat Afloat

Fittings are a major culprit in many a sinking boat case. Leaky underwater fittings, air conditioning fittings and other above-water fittings can be big trouble for your boat. Check them thoroughly before leaving your boat docked.

Beware of rainwater (or melted snow). Water that is not properly draining from your vessel can easily (and dangerously) weigh down your boat. This is also a danger when out on the water, as you may overload a boat that is already being weighed down with undrained water (leading to you and your friends taking an unexpected swim).

Use a boat lift. Though not a substitute for maintenance and regular inspections, a boat lift can help keep your boat from getting stuck under or damaged on the docks — a common cause of boat sinking incidents.

It is especially important to give your boat a visit after heavy rains and big storms, as winds can damage improperly secured vessels and, as mentioned above, rainwater can add significant weight that may sink your boat if it is not draining correctly. With a little attention, you can spot dangers that would otherwise sink your hopes of a good time on the water this summer.

Make a Commissioning Checklist to Spring into Boating Season

Commissioning Checklist

 

Spring–the season of warming weather, the cleaning out of closets and, as it turns out, creating a commissioning checklist to get your vessel ready for heavy usage come summertime. Back in December, we also recommended you get a checklist together, but it’s already about that time to give your boat a bit more TLC than you ordinarily would throughout the year. With some help from Discover Boating’s extensive list of items to add to your commissioning checklist, we will highlight some of the most important to-dos before summer is in full swing.

A Commissioning Checklist Worth Checking

  • Hull Assessment: Inspect your vessel’s hulls from front to back and top to bottom. Look out for noticeable damage, blisters in paint and stress cracks, all of which should be addressed before your next trip to avoid more costly fixes down the road.
  • Corrosion Check: As we’ve discussed before, corrosion can be a major problem if you do not properly protect your vessel from it. Inspect your vessel, especially your engine and cables, for signs of corrosion and replace parts as necessary.
  • Leaks Inspection: Check your lines and hoses for leaks, especially your fuel lines, tank and filter. Lines should be free from cracks or stiffness that could soon lead to damage.
  • Safety Update: Thoroughly inspect all safety equipment, including personal flotation devices, fire extinguishers and flares. If any of these items are damaged or out of date, replace them immediately as you never know when you’ll need them next.
  • Paperwork Review: Check that your boating license, registration and insurance policy are all accurate and up to date before you hit the water.

If you’re still unsure what needs to be on your specific commissioning checklist, we’d recommend asking a fellow boating friend for a bit of advice in the matter. Though each boat’s specific needs and points of concern will vary, a friend may be able to point you in the right direction as far as finding that one last list item that you completely forgot to add. Though Floridians are fortunate enough to have summer-like weather all year long, there’s just something in the air during our summer months that begs us to spend our days cruising, fishing or simply relaxing on the water. Avoid a boat-load of stress by ensuring that your vessel is up to snuff before you plan your summer boat trip.

 

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